Immunizations

There is a long list of diseases that can be prevented with vaccination including chickenpox, mumps and polio. Vaccines provide the most-effective and longest-lasting methods of preventing infectious diseases across all age groups. The Vaccine Preventable Disease (VPD) program at the Thunder Bay District Health Unit provides immunization services within the District of Thunder Bay to reduce the risk of getting these diseases. We do this by:

  • Providing a weekly immunization clinic for the general public 
  • Providing immunization clinics in schools across the District of Thunder Bay
  • Providing annual community flu vaccine clinics across the District of Thunder Bay
  • Providing counselling and immunization services through the TBDHU Travel Clinic for those travelling outside of Canada
  • Assessing the immunization records of children attending schools and licensed day cares to make sure they are up to date with all mandatory immunizations
  • Working with health care providers to ensure the proper storage and distribution of provincially funded vaccines
  • Providing immunizations at no or low cost.

 

Immunization and You

Publicly Funded Immunization Schedules (When to Get Vaccinated for What)

The Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care's Publicly Funded Immunization Schedules for Ontario provides a list of vaccines and the recommended vaccine schedules. To get this list and for more information, please visit the MoHLTC’s Immunization.

 

Get Your Flu Shot!

Influenza or “the flu” is a serious infection that can lead to serious medical conditions and even death. Since it is a virus, the best way to fight the flu is to not get it in the first place. Yearly vaccinations help reduce your risk of getting the flu. Please visit ThunderBayFlu.ca for more information including free vaccination schedules.

 

List of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases

This list gives a brief overview of each disease. Most of the required vaccinations are given in combination with other vaccinations. All required vaccinations are offered free of charge to residents of Ontario, while most other vaccinations are available for a fee. A list of those vaccination fees is available.

More information about these diseases and the vaccines that help prevent them can be found on the MoHLTC’s Fact Sheets and Patient Tools web page.

 

Diseases that Require Routine Vaccination

Diphtheria

Diphtheria is a very serious bacterial infection that can cause breathing problems, heart failure, paralysis (loss of control over muscles in the body) and death.

 

Learn more about Diphtheria
Tetanus (Lockjaw) Tetanus is caused by tetanus bacteria, which is found in soil, dust, and manure. Tetanus causes severe cramping – so severe that it can break bones. 1 in 5 people who contract tetanus die, even with treatment. Learn more about Tetanus
Polio Polio is a serious disease caused by polio bacteria. This disease can cause nerve damage and can paralyze muscles. The vaccine is given in combination with other vaccines. Learn more about Polio
Measles

Measles is a highly contagious viral infection spread mainly through coughing and sneezing. Symptoms include fever, a rash and sometimes white spots on the inside of the mouth and throat. Although most people recover from measles it can be dangerous for some people, especially young babies, pregnant women and people with weakened immune systems. The vaccine is given in combination with other vaccines.

Learn more about Measles
Mumps Mumps is contagious viral infection that is usually spread through coughing and sneezing. Symptoms include fever and the characteristic swelling of the cheeks. Although most people recover from mumps it can cause lead to fertility problems in males who have already reached puberty. Learn more about Mumps
Rubella (German Measles) Rubella is a contagious viral infection that is usually spread through coughing and sneezing. Symptoms include a rash that starts on the face and spreads across the body, fever and red eyes. Although most people recover from rubella, in pregnant women it can cause serious problems during pregnancy including miscarriage or birth defects such as deafness, blindness, intellectual disability and heart defects. In others it can cause joint pain and a swelling of the brain. Learn more about Rubella
Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Pertussis is a serious bacterial infection usually spread through coughing and sneezing. Symptoms include a cough that can last for weeks. It can lead to serious complications including pneumonia, seizures and brain damage. Although most adults do not have a high risk of complications, they are usually the ones passing it along to children. Babies and very small children are at most risk. Learn more about Whooping Cough

 

 

Diseases that have Recommended but Optional Vaccines

Rotavirus

Rotavirus is a common infection that causes vomiting and diarrhea in infants and children. Rotavirus is very contagious, spreading easily from children who are already infected to other infants, children and sometimes adults. Serious but rare symptoms include severe diarrhea leading to hospitalization.

Learn more about Rotavirus
Hepatitis A Hepatitis A is a virus that attacks the liver causing fever, loss of appetite, nausea and jaundice. Unlike hepatitis B, there are not usually any long-term effects. The vaccine can be given in combination with the hepatitis B vaccine. It is usually only recommended for those at higher risk of contracting the disease including those travelling to countries where it is more common. Learn more about Hepatitis A
Hepatitis B Hepatitis B is a serious virus that attacks the liver, leading to jaundice and permanent liver damage. It is also one of the leading causes of liver cancer. There is no cure for hepatitis B, so vaccination is the best way to protect yourself. The vaccine can be given in combination with the hepatitis A vaccine. Learn more about Hepatitis B
Varicella (Chickenpox) Chickenpox is a virus that causes fever, vomiting, chills, and its characteristic raised red blisters that can cause extreme itching. Although most people recover, chickenpox can sometimes lead to other serious conditions including bacterial skin infections (germs getting into the blisters). Chickenpox can be very serious for babies and those with weakened immune systems. Learn more about Chickenpox

Meningococcal Disease

Meningococcal disease is a life-threatening bacterial infection. There are several strains, though the most common are A, B, C, Y and W. Meningococcal is a term used to describe two major illnesses – meningitis (inflammation of the membranes that surround the brain) and septicemia (blood poisoning). Most people recover but in serious cases it can lead to nerve damage and even death. Learn more about Meningococcal Disease

Influenza (flu)

The flu is caused by a virus that is highly contagious. Although most people recover, it can lead to severe medical conditions such as pneumonia and even death. There are many different strains, some more deadly than others. The best way to protect yourself is through vaccination. Learn more about the flu
Haemophilus Influenzae B (Hib)

Despite the name, Haemophilus influenza B is not the flu but a bacterial infection that can lead to serious complications including meningitis (swelling of the lining of the brain or spinal cord) and even death, especially in children under age 5. It is usually spread by coughing or sneezing.

Learn more about Haemophilus influenza
Pneumococcal Disease Invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) is a serious infection caused by bacteria. It is usually spread by coughing or sneezing. It can lead to serious complications including pneumonia, blood infections, and meningitis (swelling of the lining of the brain or spinal cord). The vaccine is most useful for children under 2 or for high-risk children under the age of 5. Learn more about pneumococcal disease
Human Papillomavirus (HPV) HPV is an extremely common virus – an estimated three out of four adults will get HPV in their lifetimes. Although most people recover from HPV (and not even know they’ve had it), in some cases it can lead to serious medical conditions including cancer in both men and women. HPV is the cause of almost 100% of all cervical cancer. Learn more about HPV

 

 

For Further Information

Call the Immunization Clinic: (807) 625-5900

or toll-free 1-888-294-6630

Last Updated: 05/07/2016