Opioid Information System

 

Alerts

  • April 12, 2018 - Nishnawbe Aski Police Service advises that seized pills contain carfentanil READ MORE
  • MARCH 9, 2018 - Thunder Bay Police Service advises that powdered fentanyl seized on March 9 was contaminated with carfentanil READ MORE
  • January 12, 2018 - TBDHU Advises of presence of carfentanil Read more

 

Have you had an Unexpected Bad Reaction to a Street Drug?

Report bad drugs here anonymously. The Thunder Bay District Health Unit will share this information with our partners to let people who use drugs know about potential hazards.

If someone is having a bad reaction now, call 911.

Submit Your Bad Street Drugs Experience

 

Opioid Data for Thunder Bay District

Thunder Bay District Health Unit is collaborating with the Thunder Bay Drug Strategy, Superior North EMS, and community partners to provide timely opioid-related information, as well as alerts to the community if toxic opioids or contaminants are detected in the drug supply.  The data below will be updated monthly, or as often as new information is available.  You can also sign up to receive alerts by e-mail.

 

Opioid-Related Data for Thunder Bay District

Opioids are a class of drugs that affect the nervous system, and can result in pain relief, physical dependence, slower breathing, constipation, and intoxication. People may use opioids to manage acute or chronic physical or emotional pain, or recreationally. Certain social and economic factors may predispose some individuals to a greater burden of opioid-related harms. These factors include, but are not limited to, income, affordable and adequate housing, job availability and security, and support networks in a community. Also, there is strong evidence to support a relationship between opioid addiction and traumatic experiences, particularly early childhood adversity. For instance, a recent study found that individuals who experienced greater adverse childhood experiences began using opioids earlier in life, and were more likely to inject drugs and experience an overdose than those with no or fewer adverse childhood experiences1. Visit Preventing Opioid Overdose with Naloxone to learn more about what can place someone at risk of an opioid overdose and how to prevent it.

It is important to keep in mind when interpreting the following data that we do not have information on the pathways that led these cases to opioid use, the factors that may have contributed to opioid-related harms, the motivations for opioid overdose, nor whether the outcomes were from prescription or non-prescription opioids.

1Stein, M. D., Conti, M. T., Kenney, S., Anderson, B. J., Flori, J. N., Risi, M. M., & Bailey, G. L. (2017). Adverse childhood experience effects on opioid use initiation, injection drug use, and overdose among persons with opioid use disorder. Drug & Alcohol Dependence179, 325-329.

 

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Paramedic Calls

Paramedic Calls for Opioid Overdose in 2017-2018

  • This information represents 911 calls for suspected opioid overdoses received by Superior North EMS. This includes calls where the responding paramedic suspected an opioid overdose.
  • This may differ from the hospital or coroner’s final diagnosis of the patient.
  • These data only include instances where 911 was called and, therefore, likely underestimate the true number of opioid overdoses in the community.
Number of Suspected Opioid Overdose Calls Received by SNEMS by month - TBay District, 2018
Data Source: Superior North EMS, Paramedic Electronic Patient Care Record.
Last Extracted: July 4, 2018

 

Paramedic Administration of Naloxone in 2017-2018

  • This information represents 911 call responses during which paramedics administered naloxone to a patient for a suspected opioid overdose.
  • In some instances, opioid overdose was not the patient’s final diagnosis.
Number of 911 calls where paramedics administered naloxone for a suspected opioid overdose in 2017: 26 (for 2018, as of June 30, 2018 there have been 38)

Data Source: North Superior EMS, Paramedic Electronic Patient Care Record.
Last Extracted: January 16, 2018

 

Administration of Naloxone Prior to Paramedic Arrival in 2017-2018

  • In some instances, a community member may administer naloxone before paramedic arrival.
  • A paramedic may recognize and record naloxone administration, or a community member may report administering naloxone. This means that these data likely underestimate the true number of naloxone administrations in the community.
  • In some instances, opioid overdose was not the patient’s final diagnosis.
Number of 911 calls where paramedics reported naloxone was administered prior to paramedic arrival in 2017: 12 (for 2018, As of JUNE 30, 2018 there have been 25)

Data Source: North Superior EMS, Paramedic Electronic Patient Care Record.
Last Extracted: January 16, 2018

 

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Emergency Department Visits and Hospitalizations

Emergency Department Visits for Opioid Overdose in 2017-2018

  • This information represents all unscheduled emergency department visits (with a valid Ontario health card number) where opioid overdose was listed as the main or contributing cause.
  • These data include all visits to Thunder Bay District hospitals, including those of residents from other municipalities who accessed care in Thunder Bay District.
  • Not all opioid overdoses will result in an emergency department visit. This means that these data likely underrepresent the true burden of opioid poisoning in the community.
  • Data for September-December are preliminary and subject to change.
Number of Emergency Dept Visits for Opioid poisoning by month, TBay District hospitals, 2017-2018
Data Source (Jan-Mar): National Ambulatory Care Reporting System (NACRS), 2017. Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, IntelliHEALTH ONTARIO.
Data Source (Apr-June): NACRS, Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI)
Last Extracted: June 24, 2018

 

Hospitalizations for Opioid Overdose in 2005-2016

  • This information represents all hospitalizations where opioid overdose was listed as the main or contributing cause.
  • These data include all visits to Thunder Bay District hospitals, including those of residents from other municipalities who accessed care in Thunder Bay District.
  • Not all opioid overdoses will result in a hospitalization. This means that these data likely underrepresent the true burden of opioid poisoning in the community.
  • This data source currently has a lag time of 5 months. So, it does not provide the most recent picture of opioid overdoses in Thunder Bay District.
Number of Hospitalizations for opioid poisoning by year, TBay District hospitals, 2005-2016
Data Source: Discharge Abstracts Database, 2005-2016. Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, IntelliHEALTH ONTARIO.
Last Extracted: December 30, 2017

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Deaths from Opioids

Deaths from Opioid Poisoning in 2005-2016

  • This information represents all deaths where opioid poisoning was considered as contributing to the cause of death.
  • These deaths may have occurred from use of a single opioid or from more than one opioid in combination with other medications, drugs, or alcohol.
  • These data include opioid poisoning deaths for residents of Thunder Bay District. They may also include deaths that occurred in Thunder Bay District for which the deceased did not have a postal code.
  • Data from 2015 and 2016 are preliminary and subject to change.
Number of Deaths from opioid poisoning by year, TBay District, 2005-2016
Data Source: Ontario Opioid-Related Death database, 2005-2016, Office of the Chief Coroner for Ontario.
Citation: Ontario Agency for Health Protection and Promotion (Public Health Ontario). Interactive Opioid Tool. Toronto, ON: Queen’s Printer for Ontario; 2017. Available from: http://www.publichealthontario.ca/en/DataAndAnalytics/Pages/Opioid.aspx
Last Updated: December 13, 2017

 

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Naloxone & Needle Distribution at TBDHU

Naloxone Kits Distributed by Thunder Bay District Health Unit, 2013-2017

  • Naloxone is a medication designed to reverse opioid overdose.
  • This information represents all naloxone kits that were distributed to individuals or organizations by the Thunder Bay District Health Unit.
Naloxone Kits Distributed by TBDHU 2013-2017
Data Source: Superior Points Harm Reduction Program, TBDHU.
Last Updated: February 9, 2018

 

Needles Distributed by Thunder Bay District Health Unit, 2013-2017

  • Superior Points Harm Reduction Program offers needle and syringe exchange as a harm reduction strategy to prevent transmission of HIV, hepatitis B, hepatitis C and other blood-borne infections and associated diseases in areas where drug use is recognized as a problem in the community.
Needles Distributed by TBDHU 2013-2017
Data Source: Superior Points Harm Reduction Program, TBDHU.
Last Updated: February 9, 2018

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For Further Information

Call the Thunder Bay District Health Unit: (807) 625-5900

To obtain naloxone or learn how to prevent overdose, visit Preventing Opioid Overdose with Naloxone

To find services to treat or reduce opioid use, visit 211 Ontario North

 

 

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Last Updated: 09/07/2018